Nailing Sacramento Roofing Shingles: Air Pressure or Brute Strength?

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Nail guns have become indispensable to the roofing and construction industries. Experienced roofing contractors use nail guns everyday to shoot nails up to 1,400 feet per second. One quick press will drive the nail right through the shingle’s slot and into the decking. While nail guns can accomplish the work much faster than a few strokes of the hammer per nail, is it practical?

special tool nails roofing job

Make no mistake; Sacramento roofing companies, like Yancey Home Improvements, still carry hammers. However, when there’s just too many roofing materials to nail, roofers turn to quicker and more efficient solutions. Shingling at several tabs per hour can be very efficient, as the
pneumatic system the nail gun uses ensures quality nailing at every pull of the trigger.

Using nail guns, roofers can complete the shingle installation process within a matter of hours. However, the nail safety guide jointly issued by OSHA and NIOSH must be strictly observed to prevent serious injuries. The nail safety guide covers topics like the use of tools with sequential triggers, proper training, and the use of appropriate protective equipment.

Nail guns come with one of several trigger systems. Some shoot one nail at a time, while others shoot multiple nails as long as the tip is pressed against the work piece. Double nailing is a common occurrence, and takes place when a second nail is fired after the first because the trigger was inadvertently activated.

Air pressure must also be constantly adjusted to drive the nails at the ideal setting. Air pressure, for the most part, doesn’t stay put, while the optimal range is between 90 and 100 psi. Many contractors that specialize in roofing in Sacramento, CA follow standard nail gun safety procedures. Licensed and experienced roofing contractors based in Sacramento County can perform re-roofs and roof repairs, among other services.

(Article Information and Image from Special tool nails roofing job; Chicago Tribune)